World War I in Classic Film: A Historical Blogathon

UPDATE:  Day 2 of the blogathon has begun over at Movies Silently!  Be sure to drop in and see all the other posts we have lined up for you.  p.s. Still have a post that isn’t listed yet?  Just send me the link and I’ll add your article to the list below.

It has arrived!  Welcome, readers and bloggers, to the World War I in Classic Film Blogathon, co-hosted by me and Movies Silently.  

This event is in honor of one of most important centenaries of our lifetimes–100 years since the Great War began.  There’s a whole range of War-related films to read about here today, and there will be more great posts over at Movies Silently tomorrow.

If you’re part of the blogathon and are scheduled for today, send me the link to your post whenever it’s ready (I’m eager to see it!).  Just leave me a comment right on this post, or you can contact me here.  Scheduled for Sunday at Movies Silently?  Then sit back and relax, because you still have a whole day to perfect your writing.  (The full roster is here.)

Enjoy all the great reading, and maybe take a little time this weekend to remember all those who gave their lives “Over There.”

Sept. 6 on Silent-ology:

Silent-ologyHearts of the World (1918)

Movies Silently | The Heart of Humanity (1918)

Silver Screenings | Nurse Edith Cavell (1939)

Destroy All Fanboys | The Big Parade (1925)

MovieFanFare | J’accuse (1919 and 1938 versions)

The Hitless Wonder | I was a Spy (1933)

Once Upon a Screen | Paths of Glory (1957)

Rick’s Cafe Texan | The African Queen (1951)

My Classic Movies | Doughboys (1930)

moviemovieblogblog | Shoulder Arms (1918)

Speakeasy | The Eagle and the Hawk (1933)

The Movie Rat | Pack Up Your Troubles (1932)

ImagineMDD | Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)

Portraits by Jenni | A Farewell to Arms (1932)

The Motion Pictures | Wings (1927)

Pre-Code.com | Sky Devils (1932)

Feet of Mud | A Soldier’s Plaything (1930)

Sister Celluloid | The Road Back (1937)

Movie Classics | The Road To Glory (1936)

Margaret Perry | Article on Mata Hari

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34 thoughts on “World War I in Classic Film: A Historical Blogathon

  1. Pingback: Doughboys (1930) | My Classic Movies

  2. Pingback: World War One in Classic Film Blogathon: Pack Up Your Troubles (1932) | The Movie Rat

  3. Thanks Doughboys is excellent and recently restored and Wings was the first oscar winner. so nice to see others have interest in these films….a recent one but with accurate history of the era is Flyboys about early airplanes. ENJOY…..and let’s bring some of that elegance back to the 21st century with us. a pocket square or a hat, something……a velvet coat or an elegant pair of shoes! would love to discuss Paths of Glory or any of the silents with group.

  4. Pingback: The Fighting 69th (1940) | Cinema Monolith

  5. Pingback: The World War I in Classic Film Blogathon! | Sister Celluloid

  6. Pingback: The Battle of the Somme (1916) | 100 Films in a Year

  7. Pingback: Hell’s Angels: the perils of plot vs. action | Girls Do Film

  8. Pingback: WWI in Classic Film — South: Ernest Shackleton’s Glorious Epic of the Antarctic | MOON IN GEMINI

  9. Pingback: The Road to Glory (Howard Hawks, 1936) | Movie classics

  10. Pingback: The Last Flight (1931) - John Monk Saunders Hijacks the Lost Generation — Immortal Ephemera

  11. Pingback: Mata Hari: Exotic Dancer, Courtesan, Spy |

  12. I finally got through all the day one articles. Thank you to you, Lea for hosting this and to everyone who posted. I learned a lot, and I’m looking forward to reading the items from day two.

  13. Pingback: Silent-ology Turns One Today! | Silent-ology

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